Far from the Madding Crowd by Alan Catlin

The view from Hardy’s cottage studio
window is impaired by an encroachment
of trees: a profusion of bird calls within,
fields of blue bells, white wild flowers.
Is a place for contemplation, exercise
walks between pages of Under the Greenwood
Tree, or Far From the Madding Crowd,
which could have been the title for a book
about how much he detested London
but isn’t, per se. Mood indigo and pale
blue the feeling now, in mid-May,
more appropriate for Wessex Tales and poems
than the most depressing novels ever written:
Tess and Jude the Obscure: all those doomed
heroes and heroines, whose modest wishes were
for a simple, better, moderately happy
life , better than the one they were living.
Were ruthlessly denied happiness,
their fates unequivocal, final, through
no faults of their own, leaving them cursed,
cast out, banished for all times, bodies buried
in one place, their hearts in another like
the creator who fostered them.

Alan Catlin is a widely published poet in the US of A and elsewhere.  His most recent book is “Books of the Dead: a memoir with poetry” about the deaths of his parents.  He is a retired professional barman and the editor of the online poetry zine  misfitmagazine.net.

Alan Catlin is a widely published poet in the US of A and elsewhere. His most recent book is “Books of the Dead: a memoir with poetry” about the deaths of his parents. He is a retired professional barman and the editor of the online poetry zine misfitmagazine.net.

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