A Room Of One’s Own by Alan Catlin

“If you believe in God, you’ll believe in anything.”
Joseph Torra

Lost weekend that became a fortnight,
waking up who-knows-where, washed
out and wary, time wiped away in self-
induced fugue state of alcohol and reefer,
pep pills and poppers.  Clothes that smelled
of a season in hell spent crawling through
sewers with the rats, blood caked, broken
fingernails and slime coated skin, caked
lips and chipped teeth, trembling with
body heat, a need more pressing than
escaping from the cold. Amid torn pages
from dozens of books strewn about beyond-
filthy-squat, room, epic poems transcribed
from dictations from dead poets, reams of
writing, all of it written in words no one
was likely ever to decipher or to understand.
Not something from a pleasure dome decreed
but something by Rimbaud, as a gun runner,
dope sick and insane, or by one of those
Russian poets he had sent arms to, who
would rather blow their brains out than
write another word.

Alan Catlin is a widely published poet in the US of A and elsewhere.  His most recent book is “Books of the Dead: a memoir with poetry” about the deaths of his parents.  He is a retired professional barman and the editor of the online poetry zine  misfitmagazine.net.

Alan Catlin is a widely published poet in the US of A and elsewhere. His most recent book is “Books of the Dead: a memoir with poetry” about the deaths of his parents. He is a retired professional barman and the editor of the online poetry zine misfitmagazine.net.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s